Bond Hearings

When someone is arrested they are entitled to have a judge review the allegations made against them. The hearing is usually within 24 hours after the arrest. This is a crucial stage in the proceeding since it gives the person arrested the chance to review the police reports and maybe even speak to important witnesses.

An attorney can work to reduce the amount of the bail, help get a bond instead of paying cash, and possibly get the person released through pre-trial services or without any bail whatsoever. Having an attorney make the case why the person arrested should be allowed out of jail while the evidence is evaluated can make all the difference in the world to the person who was arrested and to his or her family.

The State is supposed to take no more than 21 days to make a filing decision, but with high case loads it can take over a month before charges are ever filed. All the while, the person who was arrested misses out on working, meeting clients, and can even get fired—even when the allegations are completely false!

Bond hearings are usually on short notice. I tell all of my clients to call my emergency cell phone number for bond hearings, 305-984-4649.

Representation for bond hearings is really affordable, and the amount paid can be applied to cost of representation if charges are eventually filed. And even more importantly, it’s possible to save the entire amount of the bail by convincing the judge that pre-trial services are more appropriate. Call today for your free consultation.


903.046 Purpose of and criteria for bail determination.—
(1) The purpose of a bail determination in criminal proceedings is to ensure the appearance of the criminal defendant at subsequent proceedings and to protect the community against unreasonable danger from the criminal defendant.
(2) When determining whether to release a defendant on bail or other conditions, and what that bail or those conditions may be, the court shall consider:
(a) The nature and circumstances of the offense charged.
(b) The weight of the evidence against the defendant.
(c) The defendant’s family ties, length of residence in the community, employment history, financial resources, and mental condition.
(d) The defendant’s past and present conduct, including any record of convictions, previous flight to avoid prosecution, or failure to appear at court proceedings. However, any defendant who had failed to appear on the day of any required court proceeding in the case at issue, but who had later voluntarily appeared or surrendered, shall not be eligible for a recognizance bond; and any defendant who failed to appear on the day of any required court proceeding in the case at issue and who was later arrested shall not be eligible for a recognizance bond or for any form of bond which does not require a monetary undertaking or commitment equal to or greater than $2,000 or twice the value of the monetary commitment or undertaking of the original bond, whichever is greater. Notwithstanding anything in this section, the court has discretion in determining conditions of release if the defendant proves circumstances beyond his or her control for the failure to appear. This section may not be construed as imposing additional duties or obligations on a governmental entity related to monetary bonds.
(e) The nature and probability of danger which the defendant’s release poses to the community.
(f) The source of funds used to post bail or procure an appearance bond, particularly whether the proffered funds, real property, property, or any proposed collateral or bond premium may be linked to or derived from the crime alleged to have been committed or from any other criminal or illicit activities. The burden of establishing the noninvolvement in or nonderivation from criminal or other illicit activity of such proffered funds, real property, property, or any proposed collateral or bond premium falls upon the defendant or other person proffering them to obtain the defendant’s release.
(g) Whether the defendant is already on release pending resolution of another criminal proceeding or on probation, parole, or other release pending completion of a sentence.
(h) The street value of any drug or controlled substance connected to or involved in the criminal charge. It is the finding and intent of the Legislature that crimes involving drugs and other controlled substances are of serious social concern, that the flight of defendants to avoid prosecution is of similar serious social concern, and that frequently such defendants are able to post monetary bail using the proceeds of their unlawful enterprises to defeat the social utility of pretrial bail. Therefore, the courts should carefully consider the utility and necessity of substantial bail in relation to the street value of the drugs or controlled substances involved.
(i) The nature and probability of intimidation and danger to victims.
(j) Whether there is probable cause to believe that the defendant committed a new crime while on pretrial release.
(k) Any other facts that the court considers relevant.
(l) Whether the crime charged is a violation of chapter 874 or alleged to be subject to enhanced punishment under chapter 874 or reclassification under s. 843.22. If any such violation is charged against a defendant or if the defendant is charged with a crime that is alleged to be subject to such enhancement or reclassification, he or she is not eligible for release on bail or surety bond until the first appearance on the case in order to ensure the full participation of the prosecutor and the protection of the public.
(m) Whether the defendant, other than a defendant whose only criminal charge is a misdemeanor offense under chapter 316, is required to register as a sexual offender under s. 943.0435 or a sexual predator under s. 775.21; and, if so, he or she is not eligible for release on bail or surety bond until the first appearance on the case in order to ensure the full participation of the prosecutor and the protection of the public.
History.—s. 41, ch. 82-175; s. 42, ch. 84-103; s. 4, ch. 86-151; s. 1476, ch. 97-102; s. 1, ch. 2000-178; s. 18, ch. 2008-238; s. 1, ch. 2013-214; s. 2, ch. 2014-201.